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The Myth Of Compound Interest

Good article by The Deliberate Agrarian. A blog I have followed for years and who's book on making a apple cider press has greatly influenced me. I press a thousand or more pounds of apples every year. My press use to do one gallon at a time. Now using adaptations of his his plans I am up to 7 gallons each pressing.



The Deliberate Agrarian: The Myth Of Compound Interest A Basic Lesson In Financial Repression



Here is a good article on the lie of the Compound Interest Myth. Over 30 years ago I came to the same conclusion. For many years I religiously followed the idea that I could become a millionaire if I just put a few hundred dollars away every month.

I too now only invest in what I call my homestead. It has paid off hugely but not in the way the Robber Barons wanted me to follow.




Is True Self-Reliance a Myth?

A good article on the importance of one another in achieving "self-reliance".  Is True Self-Reliance a Myth?

One another is the most important parts of "self-reliance".
Following are some quotes from the article.

"Self-reliance is a wonderful ideal that is hardwired in the American psyche. Stories of the pioneers who went west and set up homesteads give us a romantic feeling that can draw us toward a rural way of life. However, that feeling has also led many people into the brick wall of homesteading reality. Living the self-sufficient life is harder than it looks. It’s important to get a realistic look first.""It takes a lot of work from many different people to give us the enjoyments we have right now. Homesteader families had to work as a close-knit team, even young children, in order to contribute enough energy to make the homestead successful enough to just survive. The ability to read this article on the web required many things most people cann…

Shopping for Health Insurance…at Walmart?! | www.clarkhoward.com

Shopping for Health Insurance…at Walmart?! | www.clarkhoward.com



"In the next week, the nation’s largest retailer is launching a health insurance buying service in 2,700 of its stores. The initiative is being called 'Healthcare Begins Here.' They’re actually contracting with a third party called DirectHealth.com to help you do the shopping. Of course, Walmart is not itself getting into the health insurance business,  nor are they earning any commissions. They're just doing this to get bodies in their stores and to fill a gap in the marketplace because many people are confused about the new health care options.  "

How To Get Generic Drugs Even Cheaper | www.clarkhoward.com

How To Get Generic Drugs Even Cheaper | www.clarkhoward.com



"Warehouse clubs offer cheap prescriptions to non-membersA new report from The Florida Sun Sentinel finds the price of a prescription can vary by as much as $170 for a 30-day supply.

A reporter named Doreen Christensen called around to price a Lexapro prescription at a variety of retailers. Here's what she found:  "Costco $6.99; CVS $114.99; Publix $118; Sam’s Club $83;Target  $147.99;Walgreens $116.99; Walmart  $115.88 and Winn-Dixie $179.99."

The beauty of Costco is you don't need to be a member to use their pharmacy. Simply show up and explain you want a prescription filled. Many Costcos have a separate entrance for their pharmacies to accommodate walk-in non-members."

Urban Frugal Prosumers in LA

An excellent post about some "Frugal Prosumers" that live in LA. We can vouch for what they are doing as we have done and do almost all of these things.


A very good blog about how to retire at 30

To read more of what he has to say go to: Getting Rich: from Zero to Hero in One Blog Post | Mr. Money Mustache



Here is just an introduction: "Hi there. If we haven’t met, my name is Mr. Money Mustache. I’m the freaky financial magician who retired along with a lovely wife at age 30 in order to start a family, as well as start living a great life. We did this on two normal salaries with no lottery winnings or Silicon Valley buyout windfalls, by living what we thought was a wonderful and fulfilling existence. It was only after quitting the rat race that we looked around and realized why we had become financially independent while most people, even with higher incomes, end up stuck needing to work until age 65. The standard line is that life is hard and expensive, so you should keep your nose to the grindstone, clip coupons, save hard for your kids’ collegeeducations, and save any tiny slice of your salary that remains into a 401(k) plan. And pray that nothing goes wrong in the 40 …

Sucker harvesting

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Every spring we harvest suckers. This year our goal was to smoke, can, and use a hundred pounds.



Sucker fillets ready to smoke. This year we converted an old gas barbecue grill to a smoker it worked real well.



A meal of fresh batter fried suckers.

Poison Ivy

Leaves Of Three, Let It Be!    Berries White, Take Flight!
 by John David Fawcett

Humans are the only members of the animal kingdom afflicted by Rhus radicans, otherwise known as poison ivy. Although it's a nuisance to people, poison ivy is of considerable value for many animals such as deer and other small mammals which browse on the leaves, twigs and berries. A popular food for birds such as grouse, quail and turkey, especially during fall migration and in winter when other foods are scarce, the small waxy, yellowish-white berries of the poison ivy plant pass through these animals and are widely distributed throughout the forest. There is rarely enough sunlight for the plant to thrive deep in the forest, but in the damp, rich soil of clearings and the forest edge it may stand upright like a shrub, spread over the ground, or be a vine climbing up tree trunks attached with thousands of aerial rootlets. The young leaves are often reddish colored in the spring and green during the sum…

Seniors increasingly being scammed as population ages

Do you have aging family members or friends? According to a MetLife survey, crimes against the elderly skyrocketed in the last year.
"If you have elderly friends or relatives, you need to stay involved in their lives. Be nosy! Visit them. To someone who is a shut in, just your presence brings them joy. It may seem dull at times, but never forget, someday you will be in those shoes."

"Be aware and be present in the financial lives of your elders.  Remember, be nosy! You don't want to find out your parents are destitute because you were looking the other way."

"Your parents were there to raise you. It's time for you to pay them back."
Read the full article here: http://www.clarkhoward.com/news/clark-howard/family-lifestyle/seniors-increasingly-being-scammed-as-population-a/nFLQ/

Soldier of Luxury

A very good article that helps understand the Frugal Prosumer Philosophy of Live Rich on Less

Read it at: Soldier of Luxury | Mr. Money Mustache



This concept of “I can be absolutely happy, with virtually nothing” is critically important to unlocking your mind from the little cage that consumer society welds around it. Most people are still stuck at, “I can be absolutely happy, if I just strike it rich and famous like the stars on TV.”Accomplished high-income people improve on this a little, saying “I will be truly happy – as soon as I have about twice what I have right now.”With a bit more wisdom, you can get to “I can be truly happy, with exactly my life right now. Nothing more, nothing less.”This is not a bad place to be, but the freedom to make positive change comes when you realize, “I can be happy with anything, I don’t need all this fluff that I have now. I am completely free to find happiness with any level of spending, consumption, complexity – or simplicity – in my life.”from …

You don't have to wait to 65 to retire

Those that know me will always hear me say you don't retire when you're 65 or whatever. But you retire when passive income exceeds expenses. Therefore if your expenses are $1 a year you can retire when you're passive income is two dollars it's that simple.
Here's a good article about how another guy who has a very similar philosophy. He retired at age 30.
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/how-to-retire-early-35-years-early-2014-01-17?pagenumber=1